Weekly Roundup – Facebook Tips Edition

This week, I began sharing a few money tips on the Frugal Dad Facebook page, along with other links I find interesting outside of the weekly roundup collection. If you are on Facebook, but haven’t yet joined us there, I encourage you to follow us.

If you’re wondering what to get me for Christmas this year, sharing a few of these tips with fellow Facebook friends to help spread the message would make for a nice stocking stuffer!

The Frugal Roundup

It’s tough to measure financial progress, particularly the progress of others. Those with the most toys often have the most debt, and those with huge incomes often spend most of it each month.

This is a good description of what peer to peer lending is and how it works. I’m a big fan of Lending Club, and have managed a 10.85% net annualized return on my investments there. Take that crappy savings rates!

With the kids out of school over the holidays, it would be a fun time to host a holiday cookie swap!

There is a frightening possibility that you could be legally forced to pay someone’s bills, someone other than your spouse. Yes, this is for real.

The Digerati Life shares 5 ways to deal with holiday stress and Christmas blues, two things I’ve been struggling with myself this year.

With all the hype about Christmas shopping, it’s easy to forget the real reason we celebrate. To help get closer to that memory, remember to give to charity this holiday season.

As 2010 draws to a close, it’s time to start thinking about taxes – here are some year-end tax deductions you don’t want to overlook.

Health care costs are on the rise. This post details how a Health Savings Account can help you save money.

A nice collection of real, practical, non-spammy ideas for making extra money from home – jobs for stay-at-home-moms (and dads).

Best of the Rest

Support Our Sponsors

Berkey® Water Filtration and Purification Systems are the ultimate in water filtration and the ideal personal protection traveling companions. Used worldwide for normal, hostile and emergency environments to provide the purest, sparkling clean water possible.

Monitor Bank Rates. MonitorBankRates.com offers a free rate search and compare service offering the latest best rates on products ranging from certificate of deposits, savings accounts, checking accounts, credit cards, mortgages and insurance.

Comments

  1. Thanks for sharing that article about filial responsibility. It’s something that I didn’t know about before.

    Doing a little research, it looks like the majority of cases around this subject involve hundreds of thousands of dollars owed to nursing homes, so if you want to avoid something like this, just keep your parents out of nursing homes. Most aren’t worth their costs anyway.

    • I live in PA and worry this will happen to my husband, me, his sister, and her husband. My MIL has been in a nursing home for 4 months, and she’s basically indigent. My husband’s family has always been poor. She is 93 with dementia, fecal and urinary incontinence, heart problems, and can’t walk alone. She can’t be left alone for any period of time. We all work and are getting by week to week. We simply couldn’t watch her 24/7.

      I wish she wasn’t in the home, but we don’t have any alternatives. I doubt she even knew anything about long term care insurance.

      • I guess I will make sure we live in one of the non filial states when we are really old. We have amassed what we think is enough- but hate the thought of our children having to pay in the end.
        Sorry to see your state does have these laws Rebecca. I am really surprised they are still enforced. Like taxes- doesn’t seem to be a way around them. Unless you make her a ward of the state…..

  2. If hospitals ever start using filial responsibility laws, that would be a major problem. If adult children have health insurance for themselves and their own children, but no coverage on their parents, and the parents don’t have good insurance, the adult children would be personally responsibility for their parents’ bills with no insurance to help. Wow. You can keep parents out of a nursing home, but you can’t really avoid all medical care.

  3. Filial responsibility is scary, especially since adult children cannot control how their parents live their lives. And what about adults from poor families who manage to move up the social economic class while their parents are still poor? What would be the incentive for each generation to do better for themselves if it can be taken away because of their parents?

  4. I guess I will make sure we live in one of the non filial states when we are really old. We have amassed what we think is enough- but hate the thought of our children having to pay in the end. Sorry to see your state does have these laws Rebecca. I am really surprised they are still enforced. Like taxes- doesn’t seem to be a way around them. Unless you make her a ward of the state…..

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>